Outdoor Recreation




American West Heritage Center

Discover a century of the past at this 160-acre living history center. Each day is dedicated to celebrating and preserving the history of the Old West from 1820 to 1920. This living-history attraction offers hands-on learning experiences as you visit with Native Americans, mountain men, and pioneers dressed in period costume. Visit their welcome center featuring historical exhibits, spacious restroom facilities, and a spectacular view of the Wellsville Mountains. Celebrate a part of our Western history with special events such as Baby Animal Day and Fall Harvest Festival.

6 miles south of Logan, on U.S. Hwy 89/91, Wellsville
(435) 245-6050 or (800) 225-FEST

Hours Mon.-Sat. 11 a.m.-4 p.m. from Memorial Day to Labor Day

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Backcountry Riding -- ATV / UTV / RZR / Jeeps

Many side roads off the Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway provide access to stunning scenery and views in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Hardware Ranch in Blacksmith Fork Canyon is another popular starting place of back-country jaunts.

various locations, Northern Utah and southeast Idaho

Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge

The 18,000-acre refuge is comprised mainly of a bulrush marsh, open water, and flooded meadows of sedges, rushes, and grasses. The interspersion of bulrush, open water and uplands provides ideal habitat for numerous waterfowl and shorebird species.

entrance 2 miles east of Paris, Idaho on local road, Paris, ID
(208) 847-1757

Year-round during daylight hours

Bear Lake State Park

Bear Lake is the Caribbean of the Rockies with stunning turquoise water and white sandy beaches. This is Utah’s second largest freshwater lake, nearly 20 miles long and 8 miles wide. This popular resort destination offers boating, jet skiing, scuba diving, fishing, swimming, and sailing in the summer. Watercraft, sailboats, and ski boats can be rented in town and on the beaches. Winter recreation includes snowmobiling and skiing in nearby Logan Canyon and ice fishing on the lake. The area is famous for its delicious raspberries. Enjoy a raspberry shake and other raspberry products.

41 miles east of Logan, along Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway, U.S. Hwy. 89, on the Utah/Idaho border
(800) 448-BEAR

Visit the Bear Lake Visitors Bureau website.

(435) 946-3343

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Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge

Bear River Migratory Bird Refuge is located in northern Utah, where the Bear River flows into the Great Salt Lake. The Refuge protects the largest freshwater wetlands of the Great Salt Lake ecosystem. Since these wetlands are surrounded by arid desert lands, it is little wonder that they have always been an oasis for waterfowl and shorebirds. Over 250 species of birds call this 76,000-acre Refuge home.

The best times to visit the Refuge are during the spring and fall but summer can be very good as well. The Visitors Center is also a great educational resource.

From Interstate 15 at Brigham City, take exit #363 (Forest Street) and turn west., Brigham City
(435) 734-6422

Auto tour daylight hours year-around / Visitors Cntr Mon-Fri 8 a.m.-5 p.m. / Sat, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. / Closed Sundays & Federal Holidays

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Boating / Water Sports

Cache Valley is the gateway to beautiful Bear Lake, a spacious water sports summer paradise. The 41-mile drive along Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway is impressive. In addition, four reservoirs are located in Cache Valley: Hyrum Dam is popular for waterskiing, fishing, and boating; Porcupine Reservoir is a great getaway and fishing spot; and water skiers also enjoy Newton and Cutler Reservoirs. Tony Grove Lake is a glacial lake located just 7 miles off Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway. It is known for its beautiful wildflowers, hiking, fishing, and canoeing. It is not open to motorized boats.

BEAR LAKE STATE PARK (435) 946-3343

HYRUM STATE PARK (435) 245-6866
Utah State Parks View Website

various locations, Northern Utah and southeast Idaho

Camping / Picnicking

More than 383 camp sites, 27 parks, and many picnic areas are located in Cache Valley and nearby Wasatch-Cache National Forest. Campgrounds in Logan Canyon are run by the U.S. Forest Service. Some take reservations and others do not. Even those taking reservations, reserve a certain number of camp sites as first come, first serve.

Click Campgrounds & RV Parks for site information.


Fishing

Anglers will find some of the best fishing in the Rocky Mountain West in Cache Valleys lakes and rivers, including Blacksmith Fork River, Logan River, and Bear Lake. Logan and Bear Rivers are known for their blue-ribbon fly-fishing. Second Dam is fully accessible. Tony Grove Lake is stocked with rainbow trout. The largest fish caught in Logan Canyon was reported to be 40 pounds. Nearby Bear Lake offers exciting fishing for trophy cutthroat and lake trout, ranging in size from 2 to 25 pounds. The annual dip netting for the small Bonneville Cisco, native only to Bear Lake, takes place in January and February.

To download our Cache Valley/Logan Canyon fishing brochure, click fishingbrochure.pdf


Golfing

Cache Valley boasts four golf courses. The Logan River and Birch Creek Golf Courses rank in the top courses in the state and top 500 courses in the nation.

Click Golf Courses for a full list.


Hardware Ranch Wildlife Management Area

A visit to Hardware Ranch Wildlife Management Area is both fun and educational. During winter months, a trip to the ranch makes a great outing for the whole family with the memorable experience of viewing up to 700 wild Rocky Mountain elk. A horse drawn sleigh gives you up close and personal views as it takes you right into the middle of the herd. The area is also an extremely popular snowmobiling area.

During the summer, Hardware Ranch area provides great opportunities for outdoor recreation and wildlife viewing. An extensive network of ATV trails will take you north all the way to Logan Canyon, Bear Lake, and southeast Idaho. Head south and explore the Monte Cristo area all the way to Ogden Valley.

15 miles east of Hyrum on U.S. Hwy 101 in Blacksmith Fork Canyon, Hyrum
(435) 753-6206

mid-December through mid-February

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Hiking

Interesting trails throughout the Wasatch-Cache National Forest and Cache Valley combine with wonderful weather during spring, summer, and fall to make hiking a delight for all ages and abilities. Logan Canyon boasts some of the most picturesque landscapes anywhere. Spring Hollow is located about 4.3 miles up the canyon and is an easy half-mile walk to one of the regions most photographed streams. An 6-mile trail winds its way to the 1,500-year-old Jardine Juniper tree. A popular 2-mile hike to the Wind Caves offers an outstanding example of arches and rooms formed by wind and ice erosion. The 1-mile Limber Pine trail, located at the summit of Logan Canyon, features interpretive information designed especially for children.

Download our free Hiking Guide or stop by the Visitors Center at 199 North Main and purchase the book, Cache Trails.

The Canyon is administered by the U.S. Forest Service. They can be reached at (435) 755-3620.


Ice Fishing

Ice fishing is a popular cold weather activity in Cache Valley. The sport requires some generally inexpensive equipment for boring a hole in the ice plus a special ice fishing rod.

The following locations in Cache Valley offer excellent opportunities to catch fish through the ice: Newton Reservoir for bluegill, bass, trout and tiger musky; Hyrum Reservoir for yellow perch and trout; and Porcupine Reservoir for trout and Kokanee salmon.


Lakes

The numerous lakes and reservoirs throughout Cache Valley and Wasatch National Forest offer a wide variety of recreational opportunities. Whether you fish, swim, canoe, water ski or just work on your tan, it's all fun.

Click Cache Lakes for more information.

Logan Aquatic Center

Logan’s outdoor swimming complex features a leisure pool, lap pool, diving well, and two water slides. (Available for private party rental.)

451 South 500 West, Logan
(435) 716-9280

Open June - August, Call for hours

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Logan Canyon National Scenic Byway

This canyon is one of the country's most beautiful National Scenic Byways. Mile-high vertical limestone cliffs tower above the route and dense forest, the winding Logan River, and mountain wildlife add to the picturesque drive, which ends at the turquoise waters of Bear Lake. The Byway is lined with camping, picnicking, hiking, and fishing areas in the Wasatch-Cache National Forest. A 7-mile paved drive off the highway leads to Tony Grove Lake. Wildflowers proliferate here between June and August. Hundreds of miles of unpaved back roads are paradise for ATV and UTV riders. They can explore north all the way into southeast Idaho or head south for a memorable trip to Hardware Ranch and Monte Cristo.

Logan Canyon is also popular during the winter with more than 300 miles of groomed snowmobile trails and the oldest family run ski resort in the U.S., Beaver Mountain.

Click logancanyon to download our Logan Canyon brochure.

Click hikingguide to download our Hiking Guide for Logan Canyon.

Another great resource for hiking is logancanyonhiking.com

Highway 89 from Logan to Bear Lake, Logan Canyon
(435) 755-3620

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Logan Skate Park

This is one of the best parks in the state. Skateboard on a 17,000 square-foot park, featuring 8-foot bowls. The park is designed for beginner, intermediate, and advanced skaters.

500 South 595 West, Logan
Logan Parks and Recreation (435) 716-9250

Daily from dawn to dusk

Free
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Mountain Valley Trout Farm

1471 West U.S. Hwy 281, Smithfield
(435) 563-3647

Nordic United

Nordic United is a non-profit organization whose mission is to promote and provide non-motorized winter recreation opportunities in the Cache Valley area of northeastern Utah.

Nordic United grooms nordic ski trails and promotes non-motorized recreation for all.

PO Box 3352, Logan

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Rock Climbing

Many climbers make a pilgrimage to Logan Canyon for the abundant vertical and overhanging limestone and quartzite faces, and for the steepness and quality of rock. With cliffs primarily facing north and south, climbers can choose sun or shade. Mild weather, low humidity, and little rain offer excellent climbing opportunities during spring, summer, and fall. More than 275 routes have been developed and approximately 230 are bolt-protected sport climbs. The remaining routes require placing natural protection. Most climbs are in the 5.10 to 5.12 range. Climbers must be respectful of restrictions designed to protect five sensitive plant species including Maguire’s Primrose, a flower found only in Logan Canyon.

Logan Ranger District (435) 755-3620

Roundrocks Flyfishing

Your one-stop and best stop for all your fly fishing needs.

Equipment - Rods & Reels - Lures - Lessons - Guided Fishing Trips

530 South Main, Logan
(435) 755-6870

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Stokes Nature Center

Discover a piece of natural history or take in the beauty of the surrounding area at Stokes Nature Center. You can make friends with live reptiles and amphibians, learn amazing things about rocks and fossils, and enjoy the native plants and animals along the Logan River. You are never too old or too young to explore nature.

2696 East US Hwy 89 (1 mile up Logan Canyon from the city of Logan), Logan
(435) 755-3239

Tues.-Fri. 10 a.m.-4 p.m.: 2nd Sat. of each month 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

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Willow Park Zoo

Willow Park has one of the greatest waterfowl collections in the region, showcasing more than 100 species. The setting offers walkways among shady willow trees and children can feed the ducks, geese, and trout. See lemurs, red fox, coyotes, elk, bald eagles, deer, bobcats, and more. Picnic and playground areas are adjacent to the zoo.

419 West 700 South, Logan
(435) 716-9625

Daily 9 a.m. - dusk: Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years

Small admission fee
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